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User Interface Messaging

Background

Project Architecture

The MASQNode (or MASQNode.exe for Windows) binary is used for two different purposes. One is called the Daemon; the other is called the Node.
The Node contains all the communications capabilities MASQ is known for. Its job is to start with root privilege, open low ports, drop privilege to user level, and settle into sending and receiving CORES packages.
The Daemon is different. Its job is to start when the machine boots, with root privilege, and keep running with root privilege until the machine shuts down. It is not allowed to communicate over the Internet, or with the Node. This reduces the chance that an attacker's hack of the Node could gain root privilege on a user's machine.
Since the Daemon is always running, it listens on a localhost-only port (5333 by default) for connections from user interfaces. UIs connect first to the Daemon on its well-known port. There are certain conversations that the Daemon can carry on with the UI (one of which tells the Daemon to start up the Node), but when it's time, the Daemon will tell the UI where the Node is so that the UI can connect directly to the Node.
If the Node crashes, the UI should reconnect to the Daemon. From there, if desired, it can direct the Daemon to restart the Node.
Any number of UIs can connect to the Daemon and the Node. Information that is relevant only to one UI is sent only to that UI; information that is relevant to all is broadcast. Currently there is no way for a UI to subscribe only to those broadcasts in which it is interested; it will receive all broadcasts and has the responsibility to ignore those it doesn't care about. If necessary, the subscription functionality can be added to the Node in the future.

Communications Architecture

Level 1

If the Daemon is started without specific settings, like this
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$ ./MASQNode --initialization
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it will try to come up listening for UI connections on port 5333. But if it's started like this
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$ ./MASQNode --initialization --ui-port 12345
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it will try to come up listening for UI connections on port 12345. If it finds the target port already occupied, it will fail to start.
The Node is started by the Daemon. When the Daemon starts the Node, it will choose an unused port and direct the Node to listen for UIs on that port. When the Daemon redirects a UI to the Node, it will supply in the redirect message the port on which the Node is running.
The Daemon and the Node listen for UIs only on the localhost pseudo-NIC. This means that all the UIs for a particular Daemon or Node must run on the same computer as the Daemon or Node: they cannot call in over the network from another machine. This restriction is in place for security reasons.

Level 2

The link between the UIs and the Daemon or Node is insecure WebSockets, using the protocol name of MASQNode-UIv2. Any other protocol name will be rejected, and no connection will be made.

Level 3

Once the WebSockets connection is established, all the messages passed back and forth between the UIs and the Daemon or Node are formatted in JSON. A message packet is always a JSON object, never a scalar or an array.

Level 4

The low-level JSON format of MASQNode-UIv2 messages is reasonably simple. It looks like this:
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{ "opcode": , "contextId": , "payload": , "error": }
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The opcode is a short string that identifies the message type. Sometimes the same opcode will be used for two different message types if they can easily be distinguished by some other context--for example if one type is only ever sent from the UI to the Node, and the other type is only ever sent from the Node to the UI.
The contextId is a positive integer best thought of as a conversation number. Just as there can be many UIs connected to the same Node, each UI can be carrying on many simultaneous conversations with the Node. When a request is sent as part of a unique conversation, the Daemon and the Node guarantee that the next message received in that conversation will be the response to that request. It is the responsibility of each UI to manage contextIds. When the UI wants to start a new conversation, it merely mentions a new contextId in the first message of that conversation; when it's done with a conversation, it just stops mentioning that conversation's contextId.
It may be tempting to use a single contextId for all the messages a UI sends in its lifetime, and this is perfectly legal as far as the Node and Daemon are concerned; but if the UI does this, it will have to determine for itself which conversation each incoming message is part of. For example, if there are three conversations going on at once, this might happen:
    1.
    β†’ Request for conversation 1
    2.
    β†’ Request for conversation 2
    3.
    ← Response for conversation 1
    4.
    β†’ Request for conversation 3
    5.
    ← Broadcast from Node
    6.
    ← Response for conversation 3
    7.
    ← Response for conversation 2
If each conversation has its own ID, it'll be a lot easier to tell what's going on when a message arrives than it will be if every message is part of conversation 555.
Some messages are always isolated, and never part of any conversation, like the Broadcast in step 5 above. These messages will be identifiable by their opcode, and their contextId should be ignored. (In the real world, it's always zero, but depending on that might be dangerous.)
Neither the Daemon nor the Node will ever start a conversation, although they will send isolated, non-conversational messages.
The payload is the body of the message, with its structure being signaled by the contents of the opcode field. See the Message Reference section below for specifics about the payload field for each type of message. It will be present if and only if the error field is not present.
The object in the error field, if present, tells about the error that was encountered in the process of trying to satisfy a request. It will be present if and only if the payload field is not present. It will have this structure:
The code field is a 64-bit integer. Its numeric value is not particularly important, but it denotes a kind of error. The UI can tell whether a particular operation is producing the same kind of error repeatedly, or different kinds of errors, by comparing one code to the next.
The message field is a string with a hopefully-friendly description of the error.
There is no provision in the MASQNode-UIv2 protocol for UIs to communicate with one another. A UI may be able to deduce, from broadcasts, the existence of other UIs, but it can never be assured that there aren't any other UIs connected to the Node or Daemon.

Level 5

The structure of the payload of a MASQNode-UIv2 message depends on the opcode of that message. See the Message Reference section below.

General Operational Concepts

Daemon

Setup

The Node requires quite a bit of configuration information before it can start up properly. There are several possible sources of this configuration information. The primary source, though, is the command line that's used to start the Node. There are many parameters that can be specified on that command line, and the Daemon needs to know them all in order to start the Node.
Accumulating this information is the purpose of the Daemon's Setup functionality, which is a large proportion of what it does.
The Daemon has a space inside it to hold Setup information for the Node. A UI can query the Daemon to get a dump of the information in the Setup space. When the Node is not running, the information in the Setup space can be changed by the UI. When the Node is running, the information in the Setup space is frozen and immutable. This is so that when the Node is running, you can use the UI to query the Daemon to discover the configuration with which the Node was started.
If a Node is shut down, a new Node can easily be started with exactly the same configuration as its predecessor as long as the information in the Setup space is not disturbed.

Start

When the Start operation is triggered, the Daemon will try to start the Node with the information in the Setup space. The response message will tell whether the attempt succeeded or failed.

Redirect

As long as the UI sends the Daemon messages that the Daemon understands, the Daemon will respond appropriately to them. But if the UI sends the Daemon a message the Daemon doesn't understand, the Redirect operation may come into play.
If the Node is not running, there's nowhere to Redirect, so the Daemon will just send back an error response.
However, if the Node is running, the Daemon will send back a Redirect response, which will contain both information about where the Node is running and also the unexpected message sent to the Daemon. When the UI gets a Redirect, it should drop the WebSockets connection to the Daemon, make a WebSockets connection to the Node on the port supplied in the Redirect message (on localhost, using the MASQNode-UIv2 protocol), and resend the original message--which, in case the UI doesn't remember it anymore, is helpfully included in the Redirect payload. If it's a valid Node message, the Node should respond appropriately to it.

Node

Database password

The Node stores its configuration information in a database. A UI should certainly never attempt to write to this database, but it also shouldn't attempt to read from it, for two reasons: first, some of the information in the database is encrypted because it's sensitive; and second, the Node does some caching work for performance reasons, so what a UI finds in the database might be several minutes or more old. The UI should ask the Node directly for the information it needs.
The information in the database that's encrypted needs a password to decrypt it. When the Node is first installed, there is no secret information in the database; therefore, the database has no password. A password can be set on the database without storing any secrets in it, if desired, but in order to store secrets, a password must be set on the database.
The password is never stored anywhere but in memory by the Node; it should not be persisted anywhere by a UI either. In order to carry out certain instructions, the Node will need the password from the UI, which means the UI will need to get it from the user.
Using MASQNode-UIv2 messages, the UI can check to see if a password is correct; it can change the database password (if it knows the old one); and it can be notified when some other UI changes the password (so that it knows the one it's aware of is no longer valid).

Configuration

The configuration information with which the Node runs (which is different from the setup information with which the Daemon starts a Node) is available via MASQNode-UIv2 as well. A UI can request the configuration information, and if the information changes for some reason, all UIs will be notified so that--if desired--they can request the latest version.

Shutdown

The Shutdown operation causes the Node to cease operations and terminate. The UI will receive a response, and then the WebSockets connection will be dropped by the Node.
Whenever the WebSockets connection is dropped, whether the Shutdown operation is in progress or not, the UI should reconnect to the Daemon.
If for some reason the WebSockets connection is not dropped by the Node within a few milliseconds of the response to the Shutdown message, that indicates that the Node has somehow become hung on the way down. In this case, the WebSockets connection to the Node will probably be of no further use. The UI may choose to inform the user that bad things are happening which will probably require user intervention.

Message Reference

The following messages are listed in alphabetical order by opcode. If several messages have the same opcode, they'll be ordered under that opcode with the request first and the response later. The opcode and contextId fields are not included in the message layouts, but they must be provided by the UI and will be specified by the Daemon or Node.
The various errors that can result from each request are not specifically mentioned unless they indicate a condition the UI can correct.

changePassword

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "oldPasswordOpt": , "newPassword": ,}
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Description:
This message is used to change the database password, provided the UI knows the existing password or is correctly aware of the fact that there is no existing password.
If the database currently has no password, omit the oldPasswordOpt field. If there's already a database password, there is no way to remove it, even if the database does not yet contain secrets.

changePassword

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
Description:
If the password was successfully changed, this is a simple acknowledgment that the change is complete.

checkPassword

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "dbPasswordOpt": }
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Description:
This message is used to check whether a password the UI knows is actually the real database password.
Note that under some circumstances, during the first few minutes after installation, a new MASQNode may not have any database password at all.
There's no way to make the Node tell you what the database password is, but if you have an idea what it might be, you can check your idea by sending this message with your idea in the dbPasswordOpt field. If you're checking to see whether there's no password, pass null in this field.

checkPassword

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "matches": }
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Description:
If you send a checkPassword request to the Node, it will respond with this message. If the password you proposed (or the absence-of-password you proposed) matched the database password, the matches field will be true; otherwise it will be false.
If there was an error checking the password, you'll get a standard error response with a 64-bit code, where the high-order eight bits are 0x01.

configuration

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "dbPasswordOpt": }
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Description:
This message requests a dump of the Node's current configuration information. If you know the database password, provide it, and the response will contain the secrets in the database. If you don't supply a password, or you do but it's wrong, you'll still get a response, but it will have only public information: the secrets will be missing.
Another reason the secrets might be missing is that there are not yet any secrets in the database.

configuration

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "currentSchemaVersion": , "clandestinePort": , "gasPrice": , "mnemonicSeedOpt": , "consumingWalletDerivationPathOpt": , "earningWalletAddressOpt": , "pastNeighbors": [ , , ... ], "startBlock": }
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Description:
This conveys the Node's current configuration information. Some of it is optional: if it's missing, it might be because it hasn't been configured yet, or it might be because it's secret and you didn't provide the correct database password. If you want to know whether the password you have is the correct one, try the checkPassword message.
    currentSchemaVersion: This will be a three-part version number for the database schema. This will always be the same for a given version of Node. If you upgrade your Node, and the new Node wants to see a later schema version in the database, it will migrate your existing data to the new schema and update its schema version. If this attempt fails for some reason, this value can be used to diagnose the issue.
    clandestinePort: The port on which the Node is currently listening for connections from other Nodes.
    gasPrice: The Node will not pay more than this number of wei for gas to complete a transaction.
    mnemonicSeedOpt: This is a secret string of hexadecimal digits that corresponds exactly with the mnemonic phrase, plus any "25th word" mnemonic passphrase. You won't see this if the password isn't correct. You also won't see it if the password is correct but the seed hasn't been set yet.
    consumingWalletDerivationPathOpt: This is the derivation path (from the mnemonic seed) of the consuming wallet. More than likely, it's m/44'/60'/0'/0/0.
    earningWalletAddressOpt: The wallet address for the earning wallet. This is not secret, so if you don't get this field, it's because it hasn't been set yet.
    pastNeighbors: This is an array containing the Node descriptors of the neighbors the Node is planning to try to connect to when it starts up next time.
    startBlock: When the Node scans for incoming payments, it can't scan the whole blockchain: that would take much too long. So instead, it scans starting from wherever it left off last time. This block number is where it left off last time.

configurationChanged

Direction: Broadcast
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
Description:
NOTE: This message is planned, but not yet implemented.
If you receive this broadcast message, then something about the Node's configuration has changed. If you're interested, you can send a configuration request and get the new info; or you can just ignore this message if you don't care. If you're caching the configuration information, this would be a good time to invalidate your cache.

crash

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "actor": "panicMessage": }
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Description:
This is a message used only for testing. It will be unrecognized unless the Node that receives it has been started with the --crash-point message parameter. It's used to test the behavior of the Node during a crash and the reactions of the software around it to that crash.
It makes the Node panic and crash at a specified time that can be chosen by the tester. The normal rule for the Node is that it's not allowed to crash because of anything it receives over the network from the outside; this message is an exception to that rule, which is why it must be enabled by a special parameter.
The actor field in the payload is the name of the actor (Node subsystem) that will be forced to crash by the message. As of this writing, the only valid value is "BlockchainBridge".
The panicMessage field in the payload is the message that will be passed to the panic!() macro by the Node immediately upon receiving the message.

crash

Direction: Broadcast
Correspondent: Daemon
Layout:
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"payload": { "processId": , "crashReason": { : }}
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Description:
When the Node has been running, and the Daemon senses that it is no longer running, the Daemon will broadcast a crash message to all UIs connected to the Daemon. This doesn't necessarily mean the Node has experienced catastrophic failure: it may have been instructed by a UI to shut down.
The processId field contains the platform-dependent process ID of the late Node.
The crashReason field is rather clumsy, and there's a card (GH-323) in the backlog to improve it. At the moment, it's an object with one field, which may be named "ChildWaitFailure", "NoInformation", or "Unrecognized". If the field is named "ChildWaitFailure" or "Unrecognized", the value is a string with additional information. If the key is "NoInformation", the value is null.

descriptor

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
Description:
Requests the Node descriptor from a Node.

descriptor

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "nodeDescriptor": }
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Description:
Contains a Node's Node descriptor.

financials

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "payableMinimumAmount" = , "payableMaximumAge" = , "receivableMinimumAmount" = , "receivableMaximumAge" = }
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Description:
Requests a financial report from the Node.
In most cases, there will be many records in the database, most of them irrelevant because of amount or age. Therefore, when the UI requests a financial report, it should specify minimum amounts and maximum ages. Records with amounts smaller than the minimums, or older than the maximums, won't be included in the results, although their values will be included in the totals.
This request will result in a cluster of queries to the database, which are quick but not instantaneous, especially on old databases that contain lots of records. A UI that makes this request too many times per second will perceptibly degrade the performance of the Node.
Amounts are specified in gwei (billions of wei); ages are specified in seconds. Values less than zero or greater than 64 bits long will cause undefined behavior.

financials

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "payables": [ { "wallet": , "age": , "amount": , "pendingTransaction": }, < ... > ], "totalPayable": , "receivables": [ { "wallet": , "age": , "amount": }, < ... > ], "totalReceivable": }
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Description:
Contains a financial report from the Node.
In most cases, there will be accounts in the database that are too old, or whose balances are too low, to show up in this report. The totalPayable and totalReceivable fields will be accurate, but they will probably be larger than the sums of the payables and receivables amount fields. The UI may choose to ignore this discrepancy, or it may generate an "Other" account in each case to make up the difference.
The wallet fields will consist of 40 hexadecimal digits, prefixed by "0x".
The age fields contain the age in seconds, at the time the request was received, of the most recent transaction on the associated account. The value will not be less than zero or longer than 64 bits.
The amount fields contain the total amount in gwei owed to or due from the associated account at the time the request was received. The value will not be less than zero or longer than 64 bits.
The pendingTransaction fields, if present, indicate that an obligation has been paid, but the payment is not yet confirmed on the blockchain. If they appear, they will be standard 64-digit hexadecimal transaction numbers, prefixed by "0x". If no pendingTransaction is given, then there were no pending payments on that account at the time the request was received.
The payables and receivables arrays are not in any particular order.
For security reasons, the Node does not keep track of individual blockchain transactions, with the exception of payments that have not yet been confirmed. Only cumulative account balances are retained.

generateWallets

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "dbPassword": , "mnemonicPhraseSize": , "mnemonicPhraseLanguage": , "mnemonicPassphraseOpt": , "consumingDerivationPath": , "earningDerivationPath": }
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Description:
This message directs the Node to generate a pair of wallets and report their mnemonic phrase and their addresses back to the UI. If the database already contains a wallet pair, the wallet generation will fail.
dbPassword is the current database password. If this is incorrect, the wallet generation will fail.
mnemonicPhraseSize is the number of words that should be generated in the mnemonic phrase. The acceptable values are 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24. It's recommended that UIs default to 24-word phrases and require the user to specifically demand a lower value, if desired.
mnemonicPhraseLanguage is the language in which the mnemonic phrase should be generated. Acceptable values are "English", "Chinese", "Traditional Chinese", "French", "Italian", "Japanese", "Korean", and "Spanish".
mnemonicPassphraseOpt, if specified, is the "25th word" in the mnemonic passphrase: that is, an additional word (it can be any word; it's not constrained to the official mnemonic-phrase list) that will be used along with the 24 standard words to generate the seed number from which the wallet keys are derived. If this value is supplied, then the user will have to specify it as well as the 24 standard words in order to recover the wallet pair. Note that neither the 24 standard words nor this value is persisted anywhere: it's up to the user to keep track of them.
consumingDerivationPath is the derivation path from the generated seed number to be used to generate the consuming wallet. By convention, it is "m/44'/60'/0'/0/0", but in this message it is required and no defaulting is performed by the Node.
earningDerivationPath is the derivation path from the generated seed number to be used to generate the earning wallet. By convention, it is "m/44'/60'/0'/0/1", but in this message it is required and no defaulting is performed by the Node.
If the user wants to consume from and earn into the same wallet, he should provide the same derivation path for both.

generateWallets

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "mnemonicPhrase": [ , , [...] ], "consumingWalletAddress": , "earningWalletAddress": }
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Description:
This message describes the pair of wallets that has been generated and configured on the Node.
mnemonicPhrase is the list of 24 (or 12 or 15 or 18 or 21) words that, when combined with the mnemonic passphrase, if specified, will produce the seed from which the consuming and earning wallets are derived. They are rendered in the requested language, including non-ASCII Unicode characters encoded in UTF-8 where appropriate.
consumingWalletAddress is the address of the generated consuming wallet.
earningWalletAddress is the address of the generated earning wallet.

newPassword

Direction: Broadcast
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
Description:
No data comes with this message; it's merely used to inform a UI that the database password has changed. If the UI is remembering the database password, it should forget it when this message is received.

recoverWallets

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "dbPassword": , "mnemonicPhrase": [ , , [...] ], "mnemonicPassphraseOpt": , "mnemonicPhraseLanguage": , "consumingDerivationPath": , "earningWallet": }
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Description:
This message directs the Node to set its wallet pair to a preexisting pair of wallets described in the message. If the database already contains a wallet pair, the wallet recovery will fail.
dbPassword is the current database password. If this is incorrect, the wallet recovery will fail.
mnemonicPhrase is the mnemonic phrase that was used to generate the consuming wallet and possibly the earning wallet as well. It must have 12, 15, 18, 21, or 24 words.
mnemonicPassphraseOpt, if specified, is the "25th word" in the mnemonic passphrase: that is, an additional word (it can be any word; it's not constrained to the official mnemonic-phrase list) that was used along with the words of the mnemonic phrase to generate the seed number from which the consuming and possibly earning wallets were derived. If no mnemonic passphrase was used to generate the wallets, this value must be absent.
mnemonicPhraseLanguage is the language in which the mnemonic phrase is supplied. Acceptable values are "English", "Chinese", "Traditional Chinese", "French", "Italian", "Japanese", "Korean", and "Spanish".
consumingDerivationPath is the derivation path from the mnemonic phrase that was used to generate the consuming wallet. By convention, it is "m/60'/44'/0'/0/0", but in this message it is required and no defaulting is performed by the Node.
earningWallet is either the derivation path from the mnemonic phrase that was used to generate the earning wallet, or--if the derivation path is unknown or the earning wallet is not related to the mnemonic phrase--the address of the earning wallet.
The consuming and earning wallet information may evaluate to the same wallet; there's nothing wrong with that.

recoverWallets

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
Description:
This message acknowledges that the Node's wallet pair was set as specified.

redirect

Direction: Unsolicited Response
Correspondent: Daemon
Layout:
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"payload": { "port": , "opcode": , "contextId": , "payload": ,}
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Description:
This message will be sent by the Daemon to a UI in response to a message with an opcode the Daemon doesn't recognize, when the Node is running. The Daemon's assumption is that such a message must be meant for the Node.
The port field contains the port number on which the Node is listening for UI connections.
The opcode field contains the opcode of the unrecognized message.
The contextId field, if present, contains the contextId of the unrecognized message. If not present, then the unrecognized message was not part of a conversation.
The payload field is a string of JSON, containing the payload of the unrecognized message.
The UI should disconnect from the Daemon, connect to the Node on localhost at the indicated port, reconstruct the original message from the opcode, contextId, and payload fields, and send it to the Node.

setConfiguration

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
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"payload": { "name": , "value": }
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Note: the design of this message is likely to change in the future. A field for the database password will appear. At the current time, there are no parameters requiring the password among those supported by this command.
Description:
This is a message used to change a parameter whilst the Node is running. The range of supported parameters (available to be set by this command) may get larger with time.
The name field in the payload is the name of the parameter which the user wants to modify and has this form: e.g. start-block or gas-price (with a dash between words).
The value field in the payload is the value to be assigned to the parameter. It must always be specified as a string, even for parameters whose values are natively of other types.

setConfiguration

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
Description:
If the value of the respective parameter was successfully changed, this is a simple acknowledgment that the change is complete.

setup

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Daemon
Layout:
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"payload": { "values": [ { "name": , "value": }, < ... > ]}
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Description:
Requests modifications to the Daemon's Setup space and a dump of the results.
The values array may be empty. If it is, no modifications will be made, but a report of the existing contents of the Setup space will be returned.
The name field is one of a set of known parameter names whose value should be changed. See below for a list.
The value field, if present, holds the new value for the parameter. If not present, the parameter value will be cleared.
Permitted names
    blockchain-service-url - URL of the blockchain service to use: currently only Infura is supported.
    chain - mainnet or ropsten. The blockchain the Node should connect to.
    clandestine-port - The port at which other Nodes will contact this one.
    config-file - Path to or name of the TOML file from which to take additional configuration.
    consuming-private-key - 64-digit hexadecimal number containing the consuming wallet's private key.
    data-directory - Path to data directory.
    db-password - Password to unlock the sensitive values in the database.
    dns-servers - Comma-separated list of DNS servers to use.
    earning-wallet - Wallet into which earnings should be deposited.
    gas-price - Transaction fee to offer on the blockchain.
    ip - The public IP address of the Node.
    log-level - The lowest level of logs that should be recorded. off, error, warn, info, debug, trace
    neighborhood-mode - zero-hop, originate-only, consume-only, standard
    neighbors - Comma-separated list of Node descriptors for neighbors to contact on startup
    real-user - Non-Windows platforms only, only where required: ::

setup

Direction: Response or Broadcast
Correspondent: Daemon
Layout:
1
"payload": { "running": , "values": [ { "name": , "value": , "status": , }, < ... > ], "errors": [ [, ], < ... > ]}
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Description:
Conveys the contents of the Daemon's Setup space. A UI will receive this message as a response (with a meaningful contextId) if it sends a setup request; but it will also receive this message as an unsolicited broadcast if another UI sends a setup request that results in actual changes to the Daemon's Setup space.
The running field will be true if the Node is currently running, or false otherwise. If true, the proposed changes, if any, in the request that stimulated this response or broadcast were ignored, because the Setup space is immutable while the Node is running.
The values array contains a list of the values in the Setup space. For each object in the list:
The name field is the name of the parameter, one of the names listed for the request above.
The value field is the value of that parameter. If the parameter has no value, the value field will be a blank string.
The status field has one of the following values:
    Default - The parameter has a default value, and has not been changed from it.
    Configured - The parameter has taken its value from a configuration file or an environment variable.
    Set - The parameter was set by a UI using a setup message.
    Blank - The parameter has no value, and no value is required.
    Required - The parameter has no value, but some value is required to start the Node.
Sometimes, the values in the Setup space may be incomplete, inconsistent, or obviously incorrect. When this happens, the errors array will be populated with error messages about the problem parameters. It's an array of two-element arrays; each two-element array will have the name of the offending parameter first, and an appropriate error message second. If there are no detectable errors, the errors array will be empty.
The presence of errors or Required parameters will not prevent the Daemon from attempting to start the Node, but it will prevent the Node from starting or running properly. The UI may choose not to offer the user the option to start the Node until the Daemon is happy, but that's optional.

shutdown

Direction: Request or Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
Description:
The shutdown message has an empty payload. As a Request, it instructs the Node to shut down. As a Response, it notifies the UI that the Node is almost shut down. (Obviously, the Node can't send a Response if it's completely shut down.)

start

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Daemon
Layout:
Description:
The start message has an empty payload. It causes the Daemon to try to start the Node with whatever configuration information is presently in its Setup space.

start

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Daemon
Layout:
1
"payload": { "newProcessId": , "nodeDescriptor": , "redirectUiPort": ,}
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Description:
If a start attempt is successful, this response will arrive.
The newProcessId field is the system-dependent process ID of the newly-running Node.
The redirectUiPort field is the WebSockets port on which the UI can now connect to the Node. The UI that actually starts the Node can take advantage of this to preemptively connect to the Node without processing a Redirect; but a UI that starts after the Node is already running must go through the Redirect operation to find it. It requires less code to simply have your UI always use Redirects.
Because the Daemon is not allowed to communicate with the Node for security reasons, the Daemon cannot know the Node's Node descriptor; therefore it cannot be included in the response to the start request. To discover a newly-started Node's Node descriptor, send the descriptor message directly to the Node itself.

unmarshalError

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Daemon or Node
Layout:
1
"payload": { "message": , "badData": ,}
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Description:
If the Daemon or the Node can't unmarshal a message from a UI, it will send this message in response.
The message field describes what's wrong with the unmarshallable message.
The badData field contains the unmarshallable message itself.

walletAddresses

Direction: Request
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
1
"payload": { "dbPassword": }
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Description:
This message directs the Node to go look for two pieces of information, two existing wallet addresses. For consuming wallet, this will be computed from the mnemonic seed and the recorded derivation path chosen by the user earlier. For earning wallet, this datum can be found in the database directly. Both addresses go back to the UI then. If these two wallets do not exist so far, an error message is propagated.
dbPassword is the current database password. If this is incorrect, the process cannot end successfully.

walletAddresses

Direction: Response
Correspondent: Node
Layout:
1
"payload": { "consumingWalletAddress": , "earningWalletAddress": }
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Description:
This message carries the pair of wallet addresses that were generated or recovered in the past.
consumingWalletAddress is the address of the generated consuming wallet.
earningWalletAddress is the address of the generated earning wallet.